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  • Writer's pictureJere Folgert

Killing Weeds with Lasers

Updated: Jan 16


Imagine ditching the backache and ditching the herbicides! The future of weed control might just involve a light show, starring none other than...lasers! Forget sci-fi fantasies; laser weed zapping is becoming a real-life eco-warrior, aiming to eliminate pesky plants with precision and minimal environmental impact.


Here's the science bit: lasers focus intense beams of light, and different wavelengths affect different things. Turns out, certain wavelengths target the chlorophyll in weeds, basically their energy factory. Zap a weed with the right laser beam, and its chlorophyll gets cooked like spinach in a microwave, shutting down photosynthesis and sending the weed into a peaceful veggie slumber (forever).


But what about friendly fire? Lasers, like good robots, can be trained to recognize the good guys from the bad. Advanced systems use cameras and computer vision to identify weeds, leaving your precious veggies and flowers unharmed. Think of it as a high-tech game of whack-a-mole, but for weeds, and way cooler.


The benefits are pretty rad: no harmful chemicals leaching into the soil, no accidental herbicide drift harming other plants, just targeted weeding action. It's like giving your garden a personalized spa treatment, removing unwanted guests without disturbing the peaceful harmony.


Of course, laser weed control is still in its early stages, like a techy toddler learning to walk. It's not perfect yet, and the equipment can be pricey. But the potential is enormous, promising a future where gardens thrive and weeds cower in fear of the light. So, the next time you see a dandelion daring to defy your lawn, imagine it facing its ultimate nemesis: a beam of sunshine wielded by a laser-powered weeding robot. The future of eco-friendly gardening is looking bright, one zap at a time!


Just remember, like any powerful tool, use lasers responsibly. Follow safety guidelines, respect your neighbors' eyes, and keep the weed-zapping fun in the garden, not the living room. Now go forth and conquer the green menace, one precise photon at a time!


GroEat Garlic Farm.  Using lasers to Kill Weeds
Laser used to kill weeds. GroEat Garlic Farm

QUESTION: Can Lasers Kill Weeds? Will Lasers Make Herbisides Obsolete?


ANSWER: Yes! Recent research and developments in the weed-killing arena use cameras, computers, and light spectrums to identify weeds. Then, lasers kill the identified weeds.


Weeds cause all kinds of problems for farming operations. Weeds are a problem in a garden because they compete with desirable plants for water, nutrients, and sunlight. They can harbor pests and diseases that can damage desirable plants. Weeds can be a serious problem in gardens, and it is important to control them effectively. The best way to control weeds depends on the type of weed, the size of the garden, and the gardener's preference.


As garlic farmers, we’ve all tangled with unwelcome weeds in our gardens or fields. Whether dandelions or crabgrass infested our garlic patch, we all know they’re a pain to remove, and a pain to prevent. For large garlic farmers, just imagine the same problem, but scaled up to cover hundreds of acres.


Lasers have the potential to join the fight against these weeds.


To deal with weeds, farmers traditionally use a spraying apparatus filled with nasty chemicals. In some cases, these weed chemicals can contaminate food crops, making them unsafe for human consumption. Some of these massive, self-propelled machines have 100-foot-wide booms that can spray gallons of anti-weed agents in a single day. Dealing with weeds typically involves nasty chemicals or loads of manual labor.


Recent research and developments in the weed-killing arena show promise in novel devices that combine camera systems, and computers to differentiate crops from weeds in the field. A variety of electronics are used, from computer imaging with multi-spectral cameras, to the use of artificial intelligence systems.


Farmers who had invested in conventional spraying machines can still use their equipment. However, instead of spraying chemicals, the nozzles that used to spray herbicide are now fitted with carbon dioxide lasers that kill weeds without nasty chemicals.




A FUNNY STORY ABOUT A LASER THAT KILLS WEEDS


Once upon a time, there was a computer and a laser that were best friends. They lived near a big, beautiful garlic farm in Montana, and they loved to play together. Lazer and Puter were best buddies. The computer was very smart. It could remember virtually everything and it had an interest in plants. Puter was very proud of his power, and he loved to show it off.


That evening Lazer watched a news report about a farmer in Wisconsin who was struggling with a weed problem. The Wisconsin farmer really wanted to stop using chemicals and weed killers. The Farmer needed a new way to get rid of the weeds. Lazer felt sorry for the Wisconsin farmer, and she decided that she needed to help, somehow.


While wandering through the yard, Laser focused her beam on a weed leaf, shot out a beam, and noticed that almost immediately, the weed started to shrivel up and die. "If I could only refine my laser beam somehow..." Laser thought to herself.


When Puter saw the weeds shrivel up and die, the computer was so happy that he gave Lazer a big hug. Lazer knew she could potentially eliminate weeds in a garden. Lazer started to think about how she could use her power to help farmers with their weed problems. She realized that she would need to team up with her friend Puter, and create a novel device that would allow them to target weeds and kill them.


"We can do this," said Puter. "Let's figure out how we can work together to eradicate weeds."


The Laser and the Computer worked together for days and then realized they were missing a key component to their prototype weed killer. They realized they needed to incorporate a device that would use a special light, reflected from plant leaves, to help the computer identify weeds. "We need a spectrometer," said Puter. "A spectrometer is a device for measuring wavelengths of light over a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum. We can use a spectrometer to analyze plant leaves. The incident light from the light source can be transmitted, absorbed or reflected from the plant leaf. Each unique plant, including weeds and crops such as garlic, reflects a unique spectrum, ."


They put an ad on Facebook Marketplace and Craigs List, looking for a kind, loving and hardworking Spectrometer. After lots of interviews, they hired Spectro. Spectro was a spectroscopy meter. Spectro was a very smart device, and he was always learning new things.


Spectro loved to identify plants by measuring the absorption of light by the plant's leaves. Spetro showed Puter and Lazer that each type of plant has a unique absorption spectrum. He showed Lazer and Puter a graph of the amount of light absorbed by the plant at different wavelengths. He told Puter and Lazer that he can quickly learn new plants, including weeds, by comparing the absorption spectrum of an unknown plant to the absorption spectra of known plants.


"That is exactly what we need," said Lazer. "If you can identify weeds, I can zap them," he said.


Puter stated, "I can help coordinate everything with my powerful computer chips, and help both of you work together!"


"Here is how I'll work to identify weeds and plants such as garlic," said Spectro. "First, I'll sample the plant's leaves by using a beam of light that will pass through the plant's leaves. Then my spectrometer's eyes measure the amount of light that is absorbed by the plant's leaves at different wavelengths. Working with Puter, we will create a graph of the amount of light absorbed by the plant's leaves at different wavelengths. Puter will help me compare the absorption spectra of known plants in our database. The plant is identified based on its absorption spectrum.


"Perfect", exclaimed Lazer. "Then Puter can point me in the exact direction of where the weed plant is growing, and I'll zap the plant's leaves with my powerful laser!"


Lazer spent time reading and learning about different types of laser beams and determined which ones would work best for killing weeds. She ordered a few new laser components from an online store, and eventually was able to create a Carbon Dioxide Beam, or CO2. Lazer told Puter and Spectdro that CO2 lasers work by emitting a beam of high-energy light that is absorbed by the water in the weed's leaves. This causes the water to vaporize, which kills the plant. CO2 lasers are precise and effective, and they do not leave any harmful residues in the soil.


Spectro went to the garlic fields and would practice for hours, identifying weeds and garlic plants. He spent most of his time at the GroEat Garlic Farm in Montana. On weekends, Spectro would also go to parks and help people identify weeds. After a lot of practice, Spectro became very good at identifying weeds. It could identify weeds with just a glance. Spectro was also good at identifying plants that are the farmer's crop, including garlic.


Puter ordered more memory and a larger solid-state hard drive, so he could store and remember all of the weeds that Spectro identified. He also installed a special robot-like arm that he could use to direct or point Lazer, so Lazer could zap the weed leaves.


That weekend, Spectro, Lazer, and Puter teamed up and worked together to create a prototype weed-killing device. They worked on their device for many months, and finally, after thousands of test runs, it was finished. They called it "Zapper." Zapper was a device comprised of a laser, a light spectrometer, and a computer, all on wheels that easily could roam through a field or garden.


The weeds did not stand a chance. Lazer started to focus his light beam on every weed that Puter and Spectro identified. Within a short period of time, virtually all of the weeds in the garlic patch were turning yellow and dying. All of the garlic plants were not affected at all. The farmer at GroEat Garlic Farm was so happy. He gave all of them a big hug.


Lazer, Puter, and Spectro were glad that they could help the garlic farmer at GroEat Farm, and they knew that they could use Zapper to help other farmers with their weed problems. They started a business selling the Weed Zappers, and they soon became very successful.


The team used their acquired wealth to help other garlic farmers. They donated money to charity, and they started a foundation to help kids grow bigger and better gardens at schools.


The team used their power to make the world a better place.


The end.




Lasers used to kill weeds.  Groeat Farm. Montana
Lasers used eliminate weeds


Lasers

Lasers can be used to kill weeds by delivering high-powered bursts of light energy to the plant's leaves. This energy causes the water in the leaves to vaporize, which kills the plant. Lasers are a precise and effective way to kill weeds, and they do not leave any harmful residues in the soil.


The letters in the word LASER stand for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. A laser is an unusual light source. It is quite different from a light bulb or a flashlight.


Here are the steps on how lasers kill weeds:

  1. A laser beam is directed at the weed.

  2. The laser beam heats up the weed's leaves.

  3. The water in the leaves vaporizes.

  4. The weed dies.


Lasers can be used to kill weeds in a variety of settings, including, commercial farms, residential gardens, greenhouses,, and landscapes. Laser weed control is a relatively new technology, but it is becoming increasingly popular as farmers and gardeners look for more sustainable ways to manage weeds. Laser weed control has several advantages over traditional methods of weed control, including:

  • It is more precise, so it does not harm crops or other plants.

  • It is more effective, so it requires less herbicide or other chemicals.

  • It is more environmentally friendly because it does not release harmful chemicals into the environment.


Laser weed control is still a developing technology, but it has the potential to revolutionize the way we manage weeds.


There are a number of different types of lasers that can be used to kill weeds. The most common types of lasers used for weed control are:

  • Carbon dioxide lasers (CO2 lasers)

  • Diode lasers

  • Fiber lasers


Carbon Dioxide Lasers

CO2 lasers are the most common type of laser used for weed control. They are powerful and efficient, and they can be used to kill weeds in a variety of settings. Diode lasers and fiber lasers are newer types of lasers that are becoming increasingly popular for weed control. They are more compact and portable than CO2 lasers, and they can be used to target weeds more precisely.


The type of laser that is best for a particular application will depend on a number of factors, including the size of the area to be treated, the type of weeds to be killed, and the budget.

Here are some of the advantages of using lasers to kill weeds:

  • Lasers are a precise and effective way to kill weeds.

  • Lasers do not leave any harmful residues in the soil.

  • Lasers are a more environmentally friendly way to control weeds than traditional methods, such as herbicides.


Here are some of the disadvantages of using lasers to kill weeds:

  • Lasers can be expensive to purchase and operate.

  • Lasers require a skilled operator to use them effectively.

  • Lasers can only be used in certain weather conditions.


Overall, lasers are a promising new technology for weed control. They are more precise, effective, and environmentally friendly than traditional methods of weed control. As the technology continues to develop, lasers are likely to become more affordable and easier to use.


Spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is the study of the interaction of matter with electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic spectrum is a vast range of wavelengths, from radio waves to gamma rays. Each type of matter absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation at specific wavelengths. This is because the atoms and molecules in matter have unique energy levels. When electromagnetic radiation of the correct wavelength hits an atom or molecule, it can cause an electron to jump from one energy level to another. This process releases or absorbs energy, which is in the form of light.


Overall, spectroscopy is a valuable tool for weed identification. It is accurate, reliable, and can be used to identify a wide variety of weeds. As the technology continues to develop, it is likely to become more affordable and easier to use.


Spectroscopy can be used to identify weeds by measuring the way they absorb and emit electromagnetic radiation. Each type of weed has a unique spectral signature, which can be used to identify it. Spectroscopy is a non-destructive method of weed identification, which means that it does not damage the plant. This makes it a valuable tool for farmers and gardeners who want to identify weeds without harming their crops.


Spectroscopy can also be used to measure the concentration of nutrients in soil and water. This information can be used to improve crop yields and reduce the use of fertilizers. Spectroscopy is a powerful tool that can be used to improve agricultural productivity and sustainability.


Here are some of the advantages of using spectroscopy to identify weeds:

  • It is a non-destructive method of identification.

  • It is accurate and reliable.

  • It can be used to identify a wide variety of weeds.

  • It can be used in a variety of settings, including greenhouses, fields, and laboratories.


Here are some of the disadvantages of using spectroscopy to identify weeds:

  • It can be expensive to purchase and operate a spectrometer.

  • It requires a trained operator to use it effectively.

  • It can be difficult to identify weeds in dense stands.


Eliminate Herbicides

That technology that incorporates lasers to kill weeds could help eliminate the need for herbicides entirely. Weeds identified by a light-sensing camera system could be zapped with high-powered lasers, instead of those nasty herbicides. A novel laser weeding system would use an AI image recognition system and a unique visual feature to determine if a plant is a desired crop or a weed.


Laser weeders can eliminate herbicides by providing a more precise and efficient way to control weeds. Herbicides are chemicals that are used to kill weeds. They can be applied to the soil or to the leaves of the weeds. However, herbicides can also harm desirable plants, and they can contaminate the environment.


Laser weeders use a high-powered laser to target and kill weeds. The laser is very precise, so it can be used to kill weeds without harming desirable plants. Laser weeders are also more efficient than herbicides. They can kill weeds quickly and easily, and they do not require the use of chemicals.


As a result, laser weeders can help to eliminate the need for herbicides. This is important because herbicides can have a number of negative impacts on the environment. They can contaminate water supplies, harm wildlife, and contribute to climate change.


Laser weeders are a new technology, but they have the potential to revolutionize weed control. They are more efficient, effective, and environmentally friendly than traditional methods of weed control. As the technology continues to develop, laser weeders are likely to become more widely adopted by farmers and other agricultural producers.


A laser weeder is a machine that uses a laser to kill weeds. It can help farmers in a number of ways, including:

  • Reduce labor costs: Laser weeders can reduce labor costs by eliminating the need for hand-weeding.

  • Improve crop yields: Laser weeders can improve crop yields by reducing competition for water, nutrients, and sunlight.

  • Improve crop quality: Laser weeders can improve crop quality by reducing the risk of weeds harboring pests and diseases.

  • Protect the environment: Laser weeders can protect the environment by reducing the use of herbicides.


Laser weeders are a new technology, but they have the potential to revolutionize farming. They are more efficient and effective than traditional methods of weed control, and they have a number of environmental benefits. As the technology continues to develop, laser weeders are likely to become more widely adopted by farmers.


In Review.

Picture this: your garden, a vibrant tapestry of blooms, but lurking in the shadows, sneaky villains called weeds. Gone are the days of back-breaking weeding, though! Enter the laser, a sci-fi weapon turned botanical guardian, ready to zap those pesky plants into oblivion. But hold on, this isn't a scene from a B-movie, it's cutting-edge science in action!

Imagine a laser beam, a precise beam of concentrated light, scanning your garden like a robotic detective. Its high-tech sensors identify the chlorophyll-rich leaves of weeds, distinguishing them from your beloved flowers. Then, with a zap faster than a hummingbird's wings, the laser delivers a burst of energy, heating the weed's water molecules like a miniature sun. This heat disrupts the plant's cell structure, sending it into a peaceful slumber, never to bother your zucchini again.


But don't worry, this laser isn't a weed-wielding terminator. It's like a tiny, targeted spotlight, leaving your precious plants unharmed. And the best part? No harmful chemicals, no soil erosion, just a clean, precise way to keep your garden weed-free and thriving.


Of course, this laser revolution is still in its early stages, like a seedling waiting to sprout. But the potential is vast! Imagine robots equipped with laser weed-zappers patrolling fields, or handheld devices for home gardeners to protect their precious patches. It's a future where science and nature join forces, creating a sustainable paradise free from unwanted greenery.


So, next time you see a weed daring to peek through your flowerbed, remember the silent laser warriors patrolling the botanical frontier. They're a testament to the power of science to solve problems, a reminder that even the smallest beam of light can make a big difference in the fight for a weed-free future. Now, go forth and cultivate your garden oasis, knowing that even the tiniest villains can be vanquished with a touch of science and a whole lot of laser-powered precision!


Weeds are a nuisance for everyone, from farmers to homeowners. They can take over gardens, fields, and even lawns, and they can be difficult to get rid of. Traditional methods of weed control, such as herbicides, can be harmful to the environment and can also leave residues in the soil.


But there is a new way to kill weeds that is more precise, effective, and environmentally friendly: laser weed control. Laser weed control uses a high-powered laser beam to vaporize the water in the weed's leaves, killing the plant instantly. Laser weed control has a number of advantages over traditional methods of weed control. First, it is very precise. The laser beam can be targeted to kill only the weeds, leaving surrounding plants unharmed. This is important in areas where crops or other plants are growing.


Second, laser weed control is very effective. The laser beam vaporizes the water in the weed's leaves, killing the plant instantly. This is much more effective than herbicides, which can take several days or even weeks to kill the weed.

Third, laser weed control is environmentally friendly. The laser beam does not release any harmful chemicals into the environment. This is important for farmers and homeowners who are concerned about the environmental impact of herbicides.


Fourth, laser weed control is easy to use. The laser weed control system is operated by a computer, which makes it easy to target the weeds and kill them quickly and efficiently.


Fifth, laser weed control is cost-effective. The initial cost of the laser weed control system is high, but the long-term savings on herbicides can make it a cost-effective investment.


If you are looking for a more precise, effective, and environmentally friendly way to kill weeds, then laser weed control is the answer. Contact your local agricultural extension office to learn more about laser weed control and to find a qualified contractor to install a laser weed control system on your property.


Here are some additional benefits of using laser weed control:

  • It can be used in a variety of settings, including commercial farms, residential gardens, and greenhouses.

  • It is effective against a wide variety of weeds, including annuals, perennials, and grasses.

  • It can be used in all weather conditions, except for heavy rain or snow.

  • It is easy to maintain and operate.


If you are looking for a safe, effective, and environmentally friendly way to control weeds, then laser weed control is a great option.


Tagged: Garlic, farmer, laser, agriculture, chemical, chemicals, crops, farm, farmer, farming, herbicide, carbon dioxide, lasers, weeding, weeds





www.groeat.com
garlic farm holding garlic bulbs

www.groeat.com
Automated Farm Lasers and Tesla Trucks


Mr. Jere Folgert is the owner of GroEat Garlic Farm in Bozeman, Montana. GroEat Farm is a small, sustainable family farm located in the beautiful Hyalite Foothills, in the shadows of the Gallatin Mountain Range. The hardneck varieties that they grow on their farm flourish, due to the combination of the very cold winters, heavy snowpack, moist spring, temperate summers, and the nutrient-rich and dynamic alluvial soils, washed down from the Gallatin Mountain Range.






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